Erythrasma medical therapy

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Luke Rusowicz-Orazem, B.S., Suveenkrishna Pothuru, M.B,B.S. [2], Maliha Shakil, M.D. [3], Kalsang Dolma, M.B.B.S.[4]

Overview

The mainstay of erythrasma medical therapy is topical and systemic antibiotic therapy. The primary antibiotics used for local and widespread infection include fusidic acid, clindamycin, clarithromycin, and erythromycin, respectively. Additionally, there are studies that display efficacy of systemic administration of tetracycline and chloramphenicol. There is evidence that fusidic acid therapy is more effective than topical clarithromycin and systemic erythromycin, but may be indicated less due to poorer efficiency and patient compliance. Administration of chloramphenicol is limited due to its suppression of bone marrow and heightening risk of developing neutropenia, agranulocytosis and aplastic anaemia.

Medical Therapy

The mainstay of erythrasma medical therapy is topical and systemic antibiotic therapy. The primary antibiotics used for local and widespread infection include fusidic acid, clindamycin, clarithromycin, and erythromycin, respectively. Additionally, there are studies that display efficacy of systemic administration of tetracycline and chloramphenicol.

Antibiotic Regimen

References

  1. Gilbert, David (2015). The Sanford guide to antimicrobial therapy. Sperryville, Va: Antimicrobial Therapy. ISBN 978-1930808843.
  2. Hamann K, Thorn P (1991). "Systemic or local treatment of erythrasma? A comparison between erythromycin tablets and Fucidin cream in general practice". Scand J Prim Health Care. 9 (1): 35–9. PMID 2041927.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Holdiness MR (2002). "Management of cutaneous erythrasma". Drugs. 62 (8): 1131–41. PMID 12010076.
  4. Avci O, Tanyildizi T, Kusku E (2013). "A comparison between the effectiveness of erythromycin, single-dose clarithromycin and topical fusidic acid in the treatment of erythrasma". J Dermatolog Treat. 24 (1): 70–4. doi:10.3109/09546634.2011.594870. PMID 21923567.

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